May 04 2012

LevittownPatch: Historical Site May Halt Senior Housing Development


The LevittownPatch reported on the potential housing development on the location of the grandstand and press box for the 1908 to 1910 Vanderbilt Cup Races on the Long Island Motor Parkway.

The attorney for the developer stated: "That parkway hasn't existed for decades... The Vanderbilts and people of that ilk would use it as some form of raceway, but it doesn't exist today."

 

Enjoy,

Howard Kroplick


LevittownPatch

May 9, 2012

LPOA Weighs in on Crocus Lane, North Village Green Projects


Residents gathered against the commercial property proposals facing their neighborhood.

By Nicole Murphy

Government, The Neighborhood Files, AwarenessLPOA Weighs in on Crocus Lane, North Village Green Projects
Residents gathered against the commercial property proposals facing their neighborhood.

By Nicole Murphy Email the authorMay 9, 2012   
Construction projects on the grounds near Crocus Lane and the North Village Green have been weighing heavy on the minds of Levittown residents in recent months.

The Levittown Property Owners Association (LPOA) gathered Tuesday night after an adjourned Town of Hempstead hearing regarding the Crocus Lane property where owners want to build a 50-unit senior housing development.

The property is located on an empty parcel of land located alongside the Long Island Motor Parkway, which closed in 1938.

Resident Victoria Johnson addressed LPOA with information from the adjourned hearing. She said an attendee in favor of the Crocus Lane project spoke out on the record despite the adjournment, so she did the same to provide a different perspective.

"I went there prepared with a traffic study I had done in front of my house on Orchid Road," Johnson said. "I presented facts and figures, not emotions. There were 699 cars that passed in three hours, without development. Add another 200 cars plus visitors if the facility was here."

Ilene Lubin, another Orchid Road resident, has spent her free time hanging signs and going door-to-door around her neighborhood urging residents to fight the proposal at Crocus Lane.

"We have to do what we can to protect our property and the neighborhood," Lubin said. "A lot of people tell me they have to go to work when we have a hearing. I'd rather lose a day's pay then see my property value go down $20,000 or $30,000. If you had stock and you're stock was going to go down, you'd show up at that meeting. Our house is our most valuable property."

A proposal for an assisted living facility where the bowling alley once sat at the North Village Green has also raised concern of the LPOA and residents alike.

Hempstead Town Councilman Gary Hudes opened Tuesday's meeting by announcing an open forum regarding the Wolcott Lane property that will take place Wednesday, May 30 at 7:30 p.m. at the Levittown Public Library. The property owners, along with Hudes and Town of Hempstead Supervisor Kate Murray, will address the community.

"I would like everybody to come here that night," said LPOA Vice President Andy Booth. "We will ask direct questions to the person that owns the property. That's who should be talking to us, it shouldn't be the town."

LPOA approved a motion Tuesday to develop a committee dedicated to the North Village Green property, suggested by resident Maureen Carty.

"Instead of taking everyone's time at an LPOA meeting with the dirty details of this issue, that we form a committee with people who are interested in the subject," Carty explained. "The bowling alley is just one of many issues. I think if we had a committee focused on this issue, they could report very succinctly into this whole group."

Concerned American 9:37 am on Friday, May 11, 2012: The site of the proposed senior housing was a bad investment for Terra Homes. The small development (Ciper Lane) has nice houses, but that certainly was squeezed in to that property. How are they going to squeeze a large senior development into that small spot between houses without ruining the neighborhood? The bike path or something similar certainly better fits the community. For the NVG, those areas were set aside by Levitt for local shopping and recreation. The SVG has apartments where the store used to be, but that didn't create too much density at the park next door. I can't see how they can fit such density especially so close to the houses across the street from the NVG. The owner of the NVG bowling alley bought just that, he can't expect to make a killing on development.

Reply  Henry 7:08 am on Saturday, May 12, 2012: The Crocus Lane proposal to build a ‘Senior Housing Complex’ and its impact on the neighborhood is not the biggest issue.

The bigger issue is the builder/owner’s application before the Town Board to change the zoning of this 2.55 acre parcel of land—which is surrounded on all four sides by single-family homes—from its current ‘Residential’ to ‘Special District’ zoning.

This request is the builder/owner’s attempt to escape the residential, single family home restraints of the Levittown Planned Residence District (LPRD), which has prevented piecemeal intrusion of arbitrary ‘use’ structures and businesses within the residential neighborhood and protected the physical character of Levittown.

A builder must build, a businessman must make a profit, but a ‘neighbor’ must abide by the same rules as his neighbor. They must present a plan for single family homes in accordance with the LPRD zoning.

The LPRD zoning ordinance should be made perpetual. No exceptions. Spot zoning cannot be allowed as it would set a precedent, and surely lead to the deterioration of this stable community


 


LevittownPatch

May 8, 2012

Crocus Lane Hearing to Be Adjourned Tuesday


The attorney representing the Crocus Lane Estates, a proposed 50-unit senior housing development in Levittown, confirmed they will request an adjournment at Tuesday's meeting with the Hempstead Town Board, according to a town spokesperson.

The property is located on an empty parcel of land located alongside the Long Island Motor Parkway, which closed in 1938. Residents and the Levittown Property Owner's Association (LPOA) have said that they would like the the remnants preserved, rather than built on.

William Cohn, the attorney representing Crocus Lane Estates, LLC, wants more time to discuss the proposal with neighbors, the spokesperson said.

"This is the third time they've done this, it's been on and off," said Jim Morrow, President of the LPOA.

The LPOA will hold a meeting Tuesday night, 7:30 p.m. in the basement of the Levittown Library and will be discussing both the Crocus Lane Estates and the North Village Green Assisted Living Complex.

For more information, residents can email LPOA at LPOA@optonline.net or call 516-796-7498.


 Kelly 7:50 am on Tuesday, May 8, 2012: Not attending, but really wish they would consider developing this as green-space, similar to the parklike space afforded Hicksville residents perpendicular to Levittown Pkway. This is an opportunity to retain what little natural space there is so the local community can enjoy.

Reply  Amy 7:52 am on Tuesday, May 8, 2012: They need to take these plans to Hempstead Tpke. 50 unit housing should not be in our backyards.

Reply  Donald 8:30 am on Tuesday, May 8, 2012: This area has been overgrown for decades. A new housing track with landscaping will look nicer. The number of cars will not add greatly to the community. There are 17,000 homes in Levittown, adding 50 more is minisclue.

Reply  Maureen Carty 11:20 am on Tuesday, May 8, 2012: Donald, you may wish to read Rick Ekbergs editorial to the Patch re this project, which provides some detail regarding the traffic/parking impact. Maybe after reading that, you may reconsider your comment.


Ellen Jarrell 8:31 am on Tuesday, May 8, 2012 Should have gone with the original plan to allow Terra Homes to build houses in that area, its an eyesore and just another place for the kids to hang out. Building homes means more property tax dollars for the county, it will also make that area alot more desirable, as a realtor, I believe its would be an asset to the community.

Reply  Donald 8:47 am on Wednesday, May 9, 2012: Rick Ekbergs writes, in part, that there is "existing congestion from the current local residents" between Newbridge Rd and Jerusalem Rd. There is no congestion on Orchid Rd between these two roads. I travel on Orchid Rd several times everyday and have never encountered "congestion."

Reply  Tee10:21 am on Wednesday, May 9, 2012: I disagree with Donald and the quoted below!So many cars are on Orchid. last week a Donald posted with a last name that is now gone and a poster said that Donald works for the town.......My friend lives on orchid and sometimes I count 12 cars non stop before I can pull out of her driveway

Donald: "Rick Ekbergs writes, in part, that there is "existing congestion from the current local residents" between Newbridge Rd and Jerusalem Rd. There is no congestion on Orchid Rd between these two roads. I travel on Orchid Rd several times everyday and have never encountered "congestion."

Reply  Tee 10:37 am on Wednesday, May 9, 2012: I disagree with Donald and travel Orchid daily as well. So many cars are on Orchid.
My friend lives on orchid and sometimes I count 12 cars non stop before I can pull out of her driveway

Reply  An tUasal Airgead 10:41 am on Wednesday, May 9, 2012: Crocus Lane is a short block between Orchid Rd & Blacksmith Rd, the entire length measuring less than 350 feet!They want to put the entrance to a 50 unit condo complex, with 90 parking spaces in the complex, on this small street and people don't think this will create traffic problems?Map of Crocus Lane
http://maps.google.com/maps?l=en&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1094&bih=650&wrapid=tljp1336573531625039&q=crocus+lane,+levittown,+ny&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x89c280859dc44469:0x3d0eb8357ac4e3cf,Crocus+Ln,+Levittown,+NY+11756&gl=us&ei=bH6qT6nwFqn56QG47MjVBA&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBwQ8gEwAA

Reply  Donald 8:34 am on Thursday, May 10, 2012: I don't work for the Town and I have never had to wait for 12 cars to pass before being able to enter Orchid Road. The volume of cars on Orchid Rd is simply not as bad as some would like us to believe. The property in question is an eye sore and should be developed.

Reply  An tUasal Airgead 9:39 am on Thursday, May 10, 2012: Traffic volume is steady at many times of the day and very busy at other times of the day on Orchid, primarily to cut through from one side of town to the other. Adding the multiple trips of 100+ vehicles to the existing daily usage, from one very short side street, will create congestion along the eastern end of Orchid. I think Tee was referring to this post where a Donald was identified as a member of the Levittown Chamber, not the Town. http://levittown-ny.patch.com/articles/residents-voice-disapproval-of-nvg-project#comment_3215061


Tee 9:58 am on Thursday, May 10, 2012: Yes. Chamber not Town. Sorry. I am on Orchid daily and it is not 12 cars to enter. I stated to get out Of a DRIVEWAY I have counted 12 at times and this happens a lot in the AM bc I have picked up her son for school.

Reply  Tee 1:24 pm on Thursday, May 10, 2012: There are vacancies everywhere. Not only Levittown. Look around Bellmore and old country road in Plainview. I am sure the residents like their privacy and do not care about it being vacant.

Reply  Henry 7:10 am on Saturday, May 12, 2012: The Crocus Lane proposal to build a ‘Senior Housing Complex’ and its impact on the neighborhood is not the biggest issue. The bigger issue is the builder/owner’s application before the Town Board to change the zoning of this 2.55 acre parcel of land—which is surrounded on all four sides by single-family homes—from its current ‘Residential’ to ‘Special District’ zoning.

This request is the builder/owner’s attempt to escape the residential, single family home restraints of the Levittown Planned Residence District (LPRD), which has prevented piecemeal intrusion of arbitrary ‘use’ structures and businesses within the residential neighborhood and protected the physical character of Levittown.

A builder must build, a businessman must make a profit, but a ‘neighbor’ must abide by the same rules as his neighbor. They must present a plan for single family homes in accordance with the LPRD zoning.

The LPRD zoning ordinance should be made perpetual. No exceptions. Spot zoning cannot be allowed as it would set a precedent, and surely lead to the deterioration of this stable community


LevittownPatch

May 4, 2012

Historical Site May Halt Senior Housing Development

Developer looks to build 50 units at the former site of the Long Island Motor Parkway.

By Matthew Hogan 

A company is looking to build a 50-unit senior housing development on the empty parcel of land located west of Crocus Lane in Levittown, but one thing might be standing in its way: the Long Island Motor Parkway.

The parkway closed in 1938, but residents and the Levittown Property Owners Association (LPOA) would like the the remnants preserved, rather than built on.

"I know some people in this audience want [the development], but that land was not meant to be disturbed the way it is now," Vice President Andy Booth said at the latest LPOA meeting. "That's a [historical] site."

According to NYCRoads.com, the parkway, also know as the Vanderbilt Motor Parkway, was "a private toll road that eventually stretched for 45 miles from Queens to Lake Ronkonkoma, one of the first concrete roads in the nation, and the first highway to use bridges and overpasses to eliminate intersections."

William Cohn, the attorney representing Crocus Lane Estates, LLC., the company looking to build the housing development, said that he has met with both the hierarchy of the LPOA and with the immediate budding neighbors several times over the last year. He said that his client has taken the LPOA's concerns into account.

"We have designed the buildings to match up with the character of the area," Cohn said. "The buildings have a low profile. We have made a landscaping
plan that will also be beneficial and fencing as well to separate the proposed homes from the adjoining properties."

The housing units are designed for owners ages 55 and older, however, residents ages 19 or older can live on the property, as along as the owner exceeds the required age.

Cohn also said that in an effort to keep the area local, the units will first be offered to residents of the Levittown Planned Residence District (LPRD) and then to parents of residents of the LPRD.

Howard Kroplick, president of the Long Island Motor Parkway Preservation Society, said at the LPOA meeting that he would help deter the development if that was what residents wanted.

"There is a historical perspective that you can do to delay [the development]," Kroplick said. "It worked about 20 years ago — they used the Motor Parkway as the reason not to develop here. You can make a strong case that you should preserve a section of this. It's part of American history, it's part of racing history, it's part of Long Island's history."

Kroplick also suggested using his contacts and going to Nassau County to help turn the property into a "beautiful park."

However, Cohn's objection is that the parkway is simply no longer in use.

"That parkway hasn't existed for decades," Cohn said. "... The Vanderbilts and people of that ilk would use it as some form of raceway, but it doesn't exist today."

The parcel of land has been the subject of a number of proposals since 1984. According to a 2009 story in the Levittown Tribune, during a LPOA meeting:

President [Jim] Morrow also read a letter from attorney William Cohn, representing the Josato Company (formerly Terra Homes), asking the LPOA to arrange a special meeting at the Levittown Library with residents adjacent to the section of the Old Vanderbilt Motor Parkway near Crocus Lane to discuss the company's new plans for building four houses on the property. All require variances for insufficient lot width. The company has unsuccessfully submitted various plans since 1984. The LPOA voted unanimously against this latest proposal at its Oct. 14, 2008 meeting. In this instance, as in the past, the variances again conflict with the standards set forth in Levittown's unique zoning law, the "LPRD."

The Hempstead Town Board will hold at hearing about the proposed Crocus Lane project at its meeting on May 8.


Feel free to add you comments to the article on the LevttownPatch Web page.

Comments

Rick Ekberg


A builder has currently filed plans with the Hempstead Town Board to construct several condominium units in our neighborhood. The first units are proposed to be constructed on the lot between Orchid Road, Blacksmith Road and Crocus Lane. These condos will house about 51 double and single units with parking for about 90 vehicles.

In order for the builder to proceed with such a project, the board of appeals must rule in favor of such a development. If the lot is allowed to be re-zoned by the board of appeals, this will set a precedence to construct similar condos on the lot between Orchid Road, Woodcock Lane, Skimmer Lane and Heron Lane, which the same builder also owns.

If both projects are allowed to be built on the vacant lots, the parking for the condos would be for approximately 180 vehicles (this parking does not include visitor parking which would spill out on the adjacent streets).

If each vehicle left the condo unit and then returned home for only one time during the day, it would mean 360 more vehicles passing each day on the streets between Jerusalem Avenue and Newbridge Road. Add that to the existing congestion from the current local residents. This does not take into account the commercial service vehicles needed to maintain the facilities (garbage carting, snow plows, lawn maintenance, etc.). These vehicles will also travel to and from Jerusalem Avenue and Newbridge Road.

The traffic will affect all residents on the surrounding streets. The enormous increase in traffic will endanger the safety of our children playing in and around the area's streets and parks and create long traffic backups trying to exit on to Jerusalem Avenue and Newbridge Road.

The Hempstead Board of Appeals will hear anyone who would like to speak about this matter on May 8 at Town Meeting Pavilion, 1 Washington St., Hempstead, at 10:30 a.m. The only way to prevent the condos from being constructed is to have a large turnout of people in opposition to appear before the board. If you don't show up, the board could vote in favor of the re-zoning, resulting that the condo project and the increased traffic to follow will be unstoppable.

Please join your fellow neighbors to prevent this project from being built and come to the hearing.

For more information on this please contact LPOA@optonline.net

 

Stephen Humenesky 7:29 am on Friday, May 4, 2012
Just as with the North Lanes bowling this plot of land should stay the vacant eyesore that it is because its used to be a road! You people have got to be kidding. Keep stunting development and taxes with continue to rise.
 

Maureen Carty
8:18 pm on Saturday, May 5, 2012

I disagree with Stephen Humenesky's comment especially as it pertains to the North Lanes bowling alley -- a site I am familiar with. The owner of the bowling alley has failed to maintain the property and should be cited for violations. This fact should not prevent the community from opposing a project that could negatively impact them. I do agree that we need to come up with ideas as to what we in the community would like to see done with the two sites -- North Village Green and Crocus Lane. As I understand it, a bike trail has been proposed by proponents of historic preservation. This sounds like a great idea. As for the NVG -- we are working on that. There are many examples of good development and good urban planning. Locating an assisted living facility at the NVG is not such an example. We can do better.

diane
8:31 am on Friday, May 4, 2012

Really!?? - wow, is this a major destination on anyone's bucket list?
 

Ed Erickson
8:36 am on Friday, May 4, 2012

How much development do we need to do before we become Brooklyn and Queens. Buildind on every inch of open space is not the answer to controlling raising taxes,
 

James Spina
9:16 am on Friday, May 4, 2012

My son and I just explored that stretch of vacant land last week. He's ten and when I related the past history of the area (inculding a discussion about the Vanderbilt grandstands, the aviation club nearby and the connection of thisspace to green areas in Queens he wondered "Why aren't trhey turning it in to a park before someone turns it in to a garbage dump." Nuff said.
 

Rick
9:28 am on Friday, May 4, 2012

To comment on the previous post... Taxes will always continue to rise regardless of these projects being built or wherever you live. Have you driven down Hepstead Turnpike lately to see all of the vacant storefronts or driven through the local streets with the many houses for sale? We can't even fill this real estate let alone build more. If you live in the area you would know that the streets are already over congested. The streets were not built to handle the amount of traffic and parking proposed to put on them. The vacant lot may be an eyesore for you, but we bought our house adjacent to this lot because it was open and natural. To stick 50 condo units in the middle of a single home residental area is an eyesore. Peolpe pay a premium for real estate for the look and quality of the area. Filling every open space with multi dwelling housing does not add to the quality or appeal of a neighborhood.
 

Amy
9:33 am on Friday, May 4, 2012

We need to fill the vacant stores that line Hempstead Tpke first. Put a senior housing complex in the old TSS lot!
 

 

Pam L
11:38 am on Friday, May 4, 2012
Yay to Ed, Rick and Amy; people should know the full details before voicing their opinion. This proposed development is literally in the backyards of houses on a tract of land between Blacksmith Road and Orchid Road. Would you want this in your backyard? I am all for Senior Housing but there has to be a better place for this.
 

Harvey waller
1:37 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
Plenty of open space on Hemp Tpke build housing there I dont think Kmart is coming back. Build behind Tri county they only use half of that parking lot anyway. I bought for open space too and I don't want a 3 story monstrocity built at the bowling alley
 

Cat
1:37 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
Thank you to Pam (and others). This is LITERALLY in my backyard as well. I plan to be at the meeting with the TOH this Tuesday, May 8th in order to OPPOSE this proposal. We bought our house just a few years ago. The market is tough enough right now - we don't want to lower the value of our home or deal with the traffic and difficulty this is going to create on Orchid Rd. Put it on Hempstead Tpke, not in the middle of a residential community! There is already enough / too much traffic on Orchid Rd!

In addition - the proposed housing is WAY overpriced. They say they are giving priority to area residents and their families, but I don't think anyone is going to sell their house in this market in order to move into a housing complex which is priced the same (or higher!) than they will get for their home. This means that if the project succeeds - they will not have area residents moving in - which is what the developers like to claim will be the case.

I agree a park would be a nice use of this historic land, but a senior housing complex in the middle of people's homes is not a great use of the space.
 

Pam L
2:11 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
and thank YOU Cat! I heard that this developer has and interest in this land all the way down to Pintail Lane.........imagine what the future may bring if this proposal goes through!
 

KGE
2:21 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
I would like to make a point that might be deceiving to all residents about the proposed condo project has somehow taken the title of Senior Housing. This is not senior housing that is sponsored by the town or the county. The builder is trying to neatly package this condo development in order to get the support of local residents. Senior housing as people assume, is lower priced housing that sometimes comes with lower property tax assessments to aid in the financial burden on the seniors with fixed incomes. Make no mistake about it, these are condominiums for adults 55 years and over complete with all the condo association fees. The town/county/state have no part in this proposed project and will not give any tax breaks for residents living in them. The builder says he will offer the unit to seniors of Levittown first. The asking price for a 2 bedroom unit is approx. $300,000. If you’re lucky you can get $300,000 for your Levitt house in this market. So if you want to buy in the proposed units, you have to sell your current house and hope you get $300k and move into a condo of about a third the size for the same price you sold your house for. How long would it take to sell your house in todays’ market for that price? What will happen to the real estate market when multiple seniors in Levittown put their house on the market simultaneously to try and get into these units? It will flood the market making it harder to sell and lower home values.
 

Merrick7
5:36 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
First is there not a Nassau Plan that began with Suozzi and Mangano is pushing for to create a bike and hiking trail that connects all county and hiking trails from Bethpage State Park all the way to the Queens Border? Also for those who the answer is to build to lower taxes is incorrect. Initially and on its face such developments do lower taxes. However, as successfully reasoned for Suffolk County's Open Space purchases well as the east end cooperative to purchase land in their townships, it keeps property taxes lower and property values higher. The taxes support government functions like sanitation services, sewage, water, road repair, etc. All of these for additional residents in the area will be needing these services, so the costs of providing additional residents increases not to mention more more garbage, pollution, traffic, sewage and water use will occur. Less room for open space fields, such as at the motor parkway, to prevent storm water runoff. Which will increase pollution of our dwindling water supply on long island. So we will have to build more expensive plants and machinery to process sewage and water in the future to keep long island clean. GL on the development, but if there are all these vacant and empty store fronts why does the developer not talk to one of these boarded up landlord properties to redevelop, instead of untouched space.


 An tUasal Airgead
10:39 pm on Saturday, May 5, 2012

The Nassau County Department of Public Works project to use the Long Island Motor Parkway, as the Motor Parkway Trail, for hikers and bicyclists.

http://www.vhb.com/limp/default.asp

Trail Segment F - (area for proposed condo development)
http://www.vhb.com/limp/pdf/MotorPkwayTRAIL-Seg-F.pdf

Map of full Nassau Trail
http://www.vhb.com/limp/pdf/LIMPTrailMap.pdf
 

 

Rick
7:51 pm on Friday, May 4, 2012
I just heard from Gary Hudes that the lawyer representing the builder for the senior condos is going to ask to postpone the hearing for a later date. I urge everyone to attend the LPOA meeting on Tuesday night May 8th, at 7:30, in the basement of the Levittown Library to hear the latest information about the senior condos and the NVG Assisted Living Complex project.
 

Joel Martin

11:50 am on Monday, May 7, 2012

The Crocus Lane/Josato developers are asking for re-zoning from "LPRD" zoning to "CA Residence District" (Article X, The Building Zone Ordinance of the Town of Hempstead).
This has nothing to do with housing for seniors.
"Senior" or "Golden Age" zoning is contained and described in "Golden Age Residence District" (GA) in the Ordinance (Article XII).
CA zoning permits "multiple family swellings" plus business offices. No age restrictions are specified. CA is not GA. CA zoning was never mentioned in public discussions.
The Levittown planned community was protected for 25 years by Levitt's original covenants. When these expired, the "Levittown Planned Residence District" ("LPRD," Article XV of the Building Zone Ordinance of the Town of Hempstead) was adopted by the Town on December 29, 1975 at the request of over 1,000 signed petitions by Levittown residents, to continue protection from over-development of this planned community.
To down-zone from LPRD to CA Residence District would be spot-zoning with a vengeance and a catastrophe for Levittown's future.
Daphne Rus, Secretary
Levittown Property Owners Association


Film “The Levittown Vanderbilt Cup Race Grandstand”

1993 poster for a Levittown Historical Society Meeting


Then and Now: Grandstand Area

Then: 1908 Motor Parkway Sweepstakes

Now: Levittown


Future Housing Locations Around the World?

Rome, italy

Amesbury, England

Machu Picchu, Peru

Giza, Egypt


VanderbiltCupRaces.com Honored with Two Webby Awards



Comments

May 05 2012 Craig 7:06 AM

Is there no better place to build?  Why build over a part of Long Island history?  Queens   preserved a large part of it as a bike trail.  Suffolk county preserved it as a roadway, and found it important enough to keep it NAMED.  Yet here in Nassau county, folks keep trying to build over it.  This portion has historical significance.  Why is it so important to build here?  For profit?  Thanks, but no thanks.  There are plenty of other places to look in Nassau county. 

When my son is old enough to understand, I’d rather explain the significance of this area from a park than pointing through the buildings of a 55 and over community. “Yes, Son… the roadway used to come right up through here and go up that way… past that building… between those dumpsters.”

May 05 2012 Kenneth J. Harris 10:55 AM

Local government in most cases has the power, if not the will to prevent this sort of thing.  Unfortunately the pressure from builders and their attorneys(yes, yes I know they are just “doing their job”) all too often prevails, as I have observed since I moved to Long Island back in 1952.  You can imagine the changes that I’ve seen. And yes, I’ve heard the continuous rants that housing is needed for the old, the young and ...name your own favorite group.  Hopefully local residents can organize well enough to stop this one.

May 05 2012 Howard Kroplick 7:36 PM

From Mike:
“The developer josato ( terra homes) is at it again . We need to stop this . We need to keep some history in this town . I live on Orchid rd and Heron . I love the little open space that is left . There is a meeting on this on tue may 8th @ 1 Washington St Hempstead N.Y.@1030am for more info on this please go to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or reblack72@ gmail.com . Any help would be great   Thanks mike:-((( “

May 05 2012 Scott S. 11:29 PM

I’m all in favor of progress and change, but not more housing when we’re already in the middle of a housing crisis… more inventory is not the answer. Instead of just pushing back at the developer without an alternative, let’s push for the paved greenway project instead! http://www.vhb.com/limp/

May 06 2012 James 9:35 AM

The film of then and now says it all. Add a picture of a future housing development and you have the current story of Long Island. Add a bike path and park and you have a swell of pride worthy of this area’s amazing history. I’m a Queens kid at heart, from the border town of Floral Park. Shocking to think that the areas preserved in Queens put the rest of Long Island’s counties to shame. I now live in FP, Nassau. Let’s get it together: Preserve the Vanderbilt.

May 06 2012 Art K. 7:45 PM

Message from my councilman’s office on Friday confirmed the hearing on Tues. May 8 has been postponed.  New date has not been determined.

May 08 2012 Tom 11:39 AM

Hopefully this can be kept away. As many have said there are to numerous to count of so many other vacant properties that cannot be rented for various reasons. Rebuild on many of these properties and let’s save the historical ones.

Jun 23 2012 Desmond McGlynn 12:26 AM

What a beautiful and idyllic stretch of land! Even if it was not a potential, historic sight, it should be left a open land.

Jul 04 2012 denis byrne 12:36 PM

I fully support the effort to stop the unwise development of this complex and think that the Nassau County- Motor Parkway Bike path plan would certainly add to local property values while the developer’s plan would lower the value of the adjacent real estate due to the commercial-scale type structures and down-zoning to make it possible. All neighborhoods should have as much parkland and greenspace/open space as possible, and it will give children a safe place to learn to ride bicycles and for adults to ride east to Bethpage or west to Eisenhower Park without worrying much about traffic and vehicles most of the way.

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